‘The Story’: Australia’s New Digital Magazine on the Art, Craft and Science of Storytelling

Founded by Corner of the fire creative agency, The story is a new Australian digital magazine that markets itself as storytelling over storytelling.

The magazine is edited by Chris Harrigan (featured image), former editor of Smith’s Journal, and published by Corner of the fire founder, former journalist and political advisor Ben Hart.

“As a reporter, Ben used storytelling to make sense of the world, and then he used those same tools to help small businesses and nonprofits get their stories out to the world,” Harrigan said. .

“I think it occurred to Ben in both of these jobs that storytelling is a really powerful tool.

“It’s at the heart of much of our daily life, not just in the entertainment we consume, but in the political narratives that compete for our votes and the brands we choose to engage or ignore. “

Hart was surprised that he couldn’t find a place to read about storytelling in his work. So he wanted to create a magazine that explained how storytelling intersects our life.

The magazine wanted to avoid creating another content mill, instead, The story takes a “slow journalism” approach to publishing, emphasizing thoughtful, in-depth and useful coverage to serve a diverse audience.

“It’s a place to dissect great stories to see how they work, interview professional storytellers to learn more about their craft and tackle the issues facing the media and communications worlds today,” said Harrigan.

Until there The story showcased the talent of some great Australian writers like Clementine Ford (Fight like a girl), James Hennessy (Business Insider Australia, pedestrian) and Rachel Withers (The Monthly).

The digital magazine also offers a podcast titled HistoryCraft. Hosted by Hart, HistoryCraft features interviews and discussions with Australian journalists, writers and reporters as we gain insight into their work.

Corn The story is not limited to the craft behind the stories told by journalists, writers or people in communications.

Harrigan pointed out the article by Hennessy who looks at QAnon through the prism of storytelling.

The reason the theory has spread so widely is because it’s really effective storytelling, ”Harrigan said.

“To write this article, he looked at QAnon through the lens of fan fiction. Watching how fan fiction tells stories and how those can be applied might not seem like a story at first glance, but ultimately that’s why it’s so powerful because humans tell animals.

“It’s not enough to have an idea and expect it to spread, you have to be able to express it in the form of a story. The ideas that take hold in our culture and in our minds are usually those that can be told like stories.

Asked about plans for the future of The storyHarrigan said they will continue to move forward at a pace that allows them to produce in-depth and thoughtful content.

You can consult The story here and also follow them on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.



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Amanda P. Whitten